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  • VOLTA NYC 2015

    Steven Zevitas Gallery will be at VOLTA NY, March 5 – 8, 2015. The booth will feature Franklin Evans and Ann Pibal.

    VOLTA NY is an invitational fair of solo-artist projects and is the American incarnation of the original VOLTA show, which was founded in Basel in 2005. VOLTA NY was conceived in 2008 as a focused, curated, boutique event that is a place for discovery. The exhibition showcases relevant contemporary art positions regardless of the artist’s or gallery’s age. By refocusing on artists through solo projects, VOLTA NY promotes a deep exploration of the work of its selected participants. These galleries must maintain deeply meaningful connections with their artists and follow them throughout their careers. In turn, invited galleries exhibit in an elegant venue, elevating their respective platforms for an experience mutually beneficial to fair visitors and the galleries alike.

    In March 2015, VOLTA NY inaugurates its new home location at PIER 90 in the neighborhood of Hell’s Kitchen, New York City. The landmark move positions it adjacent to Piers 92 and 94, the longtime platform for its sister fair, The Armory Show, and the focal point of March fair season. Moving to PIER 90 allows for synergy between both fairs and their collector bases while retainingVOLTA NY's distinct character and rigorous curation — the foundation for VOLTA's mission since its 2008 debut.

    VOLTA NY is a platform for challenging, often complimentary — and sometimes competing — ideas about contemporary art. Single-artist booths functioning more closely to proper exhibitions rather than traditional presentations proliferate the contemporary fair scene now. VOLTA NY has made solo projects its mandate and foundation from its inception in 2008, offering a prime opportunity to discover the practices of today's most salient artists while refocusing the art fair experience back to its most fundamental point: the art itself.

    Visit Volta Website

  • Ann Pibal in the Boston Globe

    What's Up At Boston-Area Galleries, April 16, 2013
    By Cate McQuaid

    Link to Article Online

    Each of Ann Pibal’s succinct abstract paintings moves the eye nimbly over the picture plane. Sharp angles, crisp lines, sometimes tangy color values, and, in her most recent pieces, breathy brushwork all portray a quizzical intent. She’s like a physicist scribbling equations over a white board, puzzling out vital, small-scale unknowns.

    But her methodical equations, in the acrylic-on-aluminum paintings now on view at Steven Zevitas Gallery, have a graceful simplicity you don’t see on many white boards: straight lines, intersections, and little trolley-like loafs of color that ride along the lines, adding up to a system of weights and balances.

    Look at “EXTS,” in powdery gray-blue and red. The red lines could almost map a small downtown area, with five shooting off at clean angles from a central horizontal stripe. Some of them carry freight: lean black bars, flat sandwiches of beiges and browns. A fat, red bar streaks across the top. At the bottom, a second red bar doesn’t quite reach the right border. It aborts with an alarming ragged tear. Amid the rest of the perfectly straight edges here, it’s like a pimple on a model’s face.

    Pibal’s paintings, like those of Turner Prize winner Tomma Abts, are resolutely controlled. At times, they feel arid and confined. So it’s daring when she introduces the painter’s hand, as she does in several works here. “THFR” features more straight lines, with several candy-colored ones peeling upward, splintering from their central arteries. Pibal sets them against a gray ground, painted in wide, lush strokes, tinged with color. That ground reads as a driving rain, and opens the painting to space, drama, and heart.

    Works like these are no less precise, but the artist pits that exactness against something less about motion, and more about emotion — which may just blow these delicate constructions of lines and intersections right down.